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father of



ancestor of



ancestor of



grandfather of



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A descendant of   who accompanies   from   to Israel.



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An emissary of   who is sent with eleven others to   at The men ask   to supply 's  company with some   who can serve in the rebuilt Temple. This request is honoured.



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A descendant of   who is pressured to give up his non-Jewish wife in the time of .



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Following 's  reconstruction of the walls of a national assembly is called at which   reads to the people from the Torah.   stands on the dais to 's  left.



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This   is the head of the   family during the Second Temple.



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A   and musician who participates in the dedication ceremonies for the walls of   in the time of   by playing a trumpet.



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The Judean king   is a righteous leader who walks in the ways of God. He sends a delegation of religious authorities on a circuit throughout the cities of   to teach Torah to the people.   is one of the instructors in that group.



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A   from the family of   who serves as a foreman in the repair of the Temple in the time of .



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This man leads 28 other men in accompanying   to Israel.



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A prophet who returns to   with the exiled Jews. Under the Persian king, the Jews had received permission to reclaim their land and restore the Temple. Yet, for various reasons, building of the   stalled during the tenure of 's  son, This delay spurs the prophet   to exhort his compatriots to proceed with the project. Two months after 's  appeal,   repeats 's  call and the people yield to the prophets' demands. In his speeches,   emphasizes that a physical resettling of the land and construction of the Temple are insufficient for rebuilding the relationship with God. The people must return to the ways of the Lord; if they act justly and mercifully, the Kingdom of God will be established on earth.   receives a delegation from   which has brought donations for the Temple from the Jewish community there. God instructs the prophet to use the gold and silver to fashion crowns, one of which is to adorn the head of the as a sign of God's promise that   will be successful in office (chapter 6). The advice of   is then sought by   and   who inquire whether the days which have been observed as fasts following the destruction of the first Temple (the 9th of   and the 3rd of known as ), will be abolished following the reconstruction of the   answers that in general fasts are meaningless without reform (chapter 7), and that indeed the fast days will become celebrations (8:18-19). The later chapters of   are eschatalogical and contain several difficult passages. Chapter 9 introduces a saviour king who rides into   on a donkey (9:9). In chapter 11 the prophet discusses the failure of previous shepherds to lead the people properly (11:4-14). Chapter 12 describes a siege of   by a range of nations including   however sees the light and turns on the foreign peoples (12:1-9).   will be delivered following a siege (chapter 14), and a revelation will lead to universal recognition of God:

' ' :

And the Lord will be King over all the earth; on that day there will be the Lord alone, and His name alone (14:9).

The Gemara states that God's communication with man ended with the prophets   and   ( .)

The following are selected themes (with some references) that   promotes in his speeches.

a. The people are called upon to abandon the ways of their ancestors who rejected the prophets' exhortations, and to repent (1:2-6, 7:8-14).

b. Israel's scattered people will return to their homeland where God will be with them (2:10-17, 10:10).

c. God demands that His people act justly, that they exercise compassion towards the disadvantaged (7:8-10, 8:16-17).

d. Israel will be greatly expanded and prosperous, her enemies will fall (chapters 9 and 10).

e. In the future false prophets will be exposed (13:2-6).

  receives many visions, some of which are interpreted for him by angels:

1. The prophet sees horsemen riding across the land. The riders report that the world is at peace. An angel announces that God will have compassion on   (1:7-17).

2.   sees four horns which are blamed for exiling   and These are followed by four craftsmen who will overthrow the horns (2:1-4).

3. A man is shown measuring   to determine its rebuilt dimensions. He is interrupted in the middle of his task, for   will have no boundaries (2:5-9).

4. In another vision   the   appears on trial. The priest is accused by   of an unspecified crime. God nevertheless defends   and he is restored to his position (chapter 3).

5. In 's  fifth vision he sees a candelabrum with seven arms accompanied by two olive trees to provide oil for the lamp (chapter 4). This is a message to Israel's political leader   that the spirit of God, rather than human endeavour will restore the Jewish state:

' ' - :

Then he answered and spoke to me saying, "This is the word of the Lord to Zerubavel, saying 'Not by might, nor by power, but by My spirit, says the Lord of Hosts.'" (4:6)

6.   sees a huge scroll flying through the air. The scroll will destroy thieves and those who swear falsely, in their houses (5:1-4).

7. A woman sitting in a basket and symbolizing evil is exiled from Israel to Babylon (5:5-11).

8. In 's  last vision he sees four chariots pulled by horses of different colours. The chariots are dispatched to the four directions of the compass, perhaps to execute God's judgment (6:1-8).

In chapter 8   lists ten declarations of hope (each introduced by the phrase ')  that God makes to Israel.

1. God is jealous on behalf of   (8:2).

2. God will return to   where He will dwell (8:3).

3. Peace will return to   and scenes of tranquility will be seen there:

' - : :

Thus says the Lord of Hosts: there will yet be old men and old women sitting in the squares of Jerusalem, each with a staff in his hand because of his old age. And the squares of the city will be crowded with boys and girls playing in the squares (8:4-5).

4. Nothing is impossible for the Lord (8:6).

5. God will gather his scattered people from the east and the west (8:7-8).

6. Good times have returned with the building of the Temple, and Israel will now be a blessing among the nations (8:9-13).

7. God demands social justice on pain of punishment (8:14-17).

8. Days commemorated as fasts for   will become feasts (8:18-19).

9. Nations of the world will seek God in   (8:20-22).

10. Citizens of other nations will clamour around individual Jews begging to be included in the relationship with God (8:23).

  chapters 2:14-4:7 serve as the   (supplemental Shabbat reading) to   and are read on   as well. Chapter 14 is read on




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  is King 's  teacher and protector, who crowns him king of   when he is still a child. The   guides the king throughout his life, but when the mentor dies,   turns to idolatry. 's  son   receives the spirit of God and attempts to rebuke   but the latter has him stoned to death.



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A   who participates in the dedication ceremonies of the walls of   in the time of   by playing a trumpet.



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Fourteenth king of Israel.   reigns for six months before being killed by   is the last king in the line of   and he rules in fulfillment of the promise God made to   that four of his descendants would be kings (mentioned in : ).



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  is a chief gatekeeper for the sanctuary in the time of .



father of



father of



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A descendant of .



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A   and a musician who accompanies the   to   in the time of .



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A   and a musician who plays the trumpet before the   in the time of .



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A mentor to the king of .



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  helps run the proceedings in the Temple in the time of King .



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A gatekeeper for the sanctuary in .



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The prophet   calls upon   and   to serve as witnesses to his prophecy on the downfall of .



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A son of 's  fourth king who is killed along with his other brothers by the fifth king, .



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A   from the   family after whom a division of   is named.


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